Tag Archives: Lincoln Rhyme

A Review of The Skin Collector by Jeffery Deaver

The Skin Collector
by Jeffery Deaver

I always look forward to the next Jeffery Deaver book. This time I was somewhat disappointed. Yes, The Skin Collector is still written in the same style, with chapter ending cliff-hangers and plot twists and surprises galore. Lincoln Rhyme is still the same ornery, insightful, forensic detective, trapped in his electric wheelchair.  But I felt that this book wasn’t quite as intense. The cliff-hangers seemed a little forced. You weren’t drawn in, and then slammed to the floor, like in most of Mr. Deaver’s books. If I wasn’t expecting so much, I wouldn’t have been as let down.

Another thing that bothered me about The Skin Collector was the last few chapters were there only as a lead into the next book in the series. I don’t need to have that sort of enticement. I’m going read the next Lincoln Rhyme book, and I won’t remember this little section when I do. Mr. Deaver will have to repeat most of it in the next volume anyway. So what’s the point? I just don’t get it.

Anyway, back to the review. Overall the book was OK. There were enough plot twists and unexpected events, and everything felt logical and possible, just not up to the high level of most of Mr. Deaver’s books. I give The Skin Collector 3 1/2 Stars out of 5. If you like suspense, and thrillers without too much gore, and mysteries with many surprises and unexpected twists, and haven’t read any of the Lincoln Rhyme series, then you will probably like this book. If you are new to the series, there will be a lot of references to events from the previous books, but they really won’t get in the way of your enjoyment of the story. But if you love this series, like I do, you will come away feeling somewhat disappointed, like I did, but you will read it anyway, like I did. And you will wait, hoping that the next one is as good as we know it can be.

 

Book Description
Release date: May 13, 2014

In his classic thriller The Bone Collector, Jeffery Deaver introduced readers to Lincoln Rhyme-the nation’s most renowned investigator and forensic detective.
Now, a new killer is on the loose: a criminal inspired by the Bone Collector. And Rhyme must untangle the twisted web of clues before the killer targets more victims-or Rhyme himself.
THE SKIN COLLECTOR
The killer’s methods are terrifying. He stalks the basements and underground passageways of New York City. He tattoos his victims’ flesh with cryptic messages, using a tattoo gun loaded with poison, resulting in an agonizing, painful death.
When a connection is made to the Bone Collector-the serial killer who terrorized New York more than a decade ago-Lincoln Rhyme and Amelia Sachs are immediately drawn into the case.
Rhyme, Sachs, and the NYPD must race against time to answer the many questions the investigation uncovers: Whom will the killer attack next? What is the message behind the victims’ tattoos? Does the killer’s own inking–a fanged centipede sporting a woman’s face–hold any significance? And what is his ultimate mission?
As time runs out, Rhyme discovers that the past has returned to haunt him in the most troubling way imaginable…

Product Details

Series: Lincoln Rhyme (Book 11)
Hardcover: 448 pages
Publisher: Grand Central Publishing (May 13, 2014)
Language: English
ISBN-13: 978-1455559398
Product Dimensions: 9.0 x 6.0 x 1.6 inches
Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds

Important Notice

Amazon is pricing this book higher than other booksellers. If you want to read why, see this page. A Note From Jeff

About the Author

Jeffery Deaver is the #1 international bestselling author of more than thirty novels, three collections of short stories, and a nonfiction law book. His books are sold in 150 countries and translated into 25 languages. His first novel featuring Lincoln Rhyme, The Bone Collector, was made into a major motion picture starring Denzel Washington and Angelina Jolie. He’s received or been shortlisted for a number of awards around the world. A former journalist, folksinger, and attorney, he was born outside of Chicago and has a bachelor of journalism degree from the University of Missouri and a law degree from Fordham University. You can visit his website at http://www.JefferyDeaver.com.

Born just outside Chicago in 1950 to an advertising copywriter father and stay-at-home mom, Jeffery Deaver was a writer from the start, penning his first book (a brief tome just two chapters in length) at age 11. He went on to edit his high school literary magazine and serve on the staff of the school newspaper, chasing the dream of becoming a crack reporter.
Upon earning his B.A. in journalism from the University of Missouri, Deaver realized that he lacked the necessary background to become a legal correspondent for the high-profile publications he aspired to, such as The New York Times or The Wall Street Journal, so he enrolled at Fordham Law School. Being a legal eagle soon grew on Deaver, and rather than continue on as a reporter, he took a job as a corporate lawyer at a top Wall Street firm. Deaver’s detour from the writing life wasn’t to last, however; ironically, it was his substantial commute to the law office that touched off his third — and current — career. He’d fill the long hours on the train scribbling his own renditions of the kind of fiction he enjoyed reading most: suspense.
Voodoo, a supernatural thriller, and Always a Thief, an art-theft caper, were Deaver’s first published novels. Produced by the now-defunct Paperjacks paperback original house, the books are no longer in print, but they remain hot items on the collector circuit. His first major outing was the Rune series, which followed the adventures of an aspiring female filmmaker in the power trilogy Manhattan Is My Beat (1988), Death of a Blue Movie Star (1990), and Hard News (1991).
Deaver’s next series, this one featuring the adventures of ace movie location scout John Pellam, featured the thrillers Shallow Graves (1992), Bloody River Blues (1993), and Hell’s Kitchen (2001). Written under the pen name William Jefferies, the series stands out in Deaver’s body of work, primarily because it touched off his talent for focusing more on his vivid characters than on their perilous situations.
In fact, it is his series featuring the intrepid and beloved team of Lincoln Rhyme and Amelia Sachs that showcases Deaver at the top of his game. Confronting enormous odds (and always under somewhat gruesome circumstances), the embittered detective and his feisty partner and love interest made their debut in 1991’s grisly caper The Bone Collector, and hooked fans for four more books: The Coffin Dancer (1998), The Empty Chair (2000), The Stone Monkey (2002), and The Vanishing Man(2003). Of the series, Kirkus Reviews observed, “Deaver marries forensic work that would do Patricia Cornwell proud to turbocharged plots that put Benzedrine to shame.”
On the creation of Rhyme, who happens to be a paraplegic, Deaver explained to Shots magazine, “I wanted to create a Sherlock Holmes-ian kind of character that uses his mind rather than his body. He solves crimes by thinking about the crimes, rather than someone who can shoot straight, run faster, or walk into the bar and trick people into giving away the clues.”
As for his reputation for conjuring up some of the most unsavory scenes in pop crime fiction, Deaver admits on his web site, “In general, I think, less is more, and that if a reader stops reading because a book is too icky then I’ve failed in my obligation to the readers.”

Good To Know
Deaver revises his manuscripts “at least 20 or 30 times” before his publishers get to even see a version.
Two of his books have been made into major feature films. The first was A Maiden’s Grave (the film adaptation was called Dead Silence), which starred James Garner and Marlee Matlin. The Bone Collector came next, starring Denzel Washington and Angelina Jolie.
In addition to being a bestselling novelist, Deaver has also been a folksinger, songwriter, music researcher, and professional poet.
Deaver’s younger sister, Julie Reece Deaver, is a fellow author who writes novels for young adults.
In our interview with Deaver, he reveals, “My inspiration for writing is the reader. I want to give readers whatever will excite and please them. It’s absolutely vital in this business for authors to know their audience and to write with them in mind.”

The book description is from Barnes & Noble.  The Skin Collector (Signed Book) (Lincoln Rhyme Series #11)

A Review of Trouble in Mind: The Collected Stories, Volume 3 by Jeffery Deaver

Trouble in MindTrouble in Mind: The Collected Stories, Volume 3
by Jeffery Deaver

Reading a book of collected short stories is much different than reading a novel. Some people don’t like short stories because they don’t get all the character development and plot twists that are the essence of a great novel. But the way that Mr. Deaver thinks about short stories, which is distilling an idea down to the essential elements of plot, a few characters, with the major plot twist at the end of the story, is exactly the type of short story that I like to read.

I have always enjoyed reading short story collections. I have read many of the “Best of the Year” type collections, both in the mystery and science fiction genres, since I was a teenager back in the sixties. It seemed that there were many more quality short stories being written back then. A lot of mainstream magazines would publish a couple short stories in each issue, but all of those outlets are gone now. There still are some genre specific magazines out there, but who reads them? I know that I don’t purchase printed magazines anymore. I am more likely to listen to a podcast than read a magazine, so story collections like this are the main opportunity to read some great short fiction.

This is Mr. Deaver at his finest. He has collected 12 great stories in this volume. Six of the stories are new, which means that you may have read some of the stories already, but that happens with any collection of stories. Most of the time the stories are worth re-reading anyway. There wasn’t a stinker in the group. If you are a fan of Mr. Deaver’s series books, you will be happy to hear that there are stories in here that include characters from all three of them. The non-series stories allow Mr. Deaver a bit more freedom. He gets to push the boundaries, to go a little outside of the normal genre limits that contain him in his series novels. I like that. I have wanted to read his Twisted collections, and now I have to put them on my “Books To Read” list.

I give Trouble in Mind 4 1/2 Stars out of 5 and a Big Thumbs Up! Anyone who enjoys reading short fiction will like this collection.

I received this Digital Review Copy for free from NetGalley.com.

Book Description
Release date: March 4, 2014

Fiendish suspense. Shocking twists.
Twelve diabolical tales.

New York Times bestselling author and highly acclaimed storyteller Jeffery Deaver-the undisputed “grand master of the plot twist” (Booklist)-returns with a dazzling new collection of short stories. In these twelve electrifying tales (including six written just for this anthology) Deaver proves once again his genius for the unexpected-in his world, appearances are always deceiving.

A devoted housekeeper embarks on a quest to find the truth behind her employer’s murder. A washed-up Hollywood actor gets one last, high-stakes chance to revive his career. A man makes an impulsive visit to his hometown, and learns more about his past than he bargained for. Two Olympic track hopefuls receive terrorist threats. And Deaver’s beloved series characters Lincoln Rhyme, Kathryn Dance, and John Pellam return in stories now in print for the first time.

Product Details

Hardcover: 496 pages
Publisher: Grand Central Publishing (March 4, 2014)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1455526797
ISBN-13: 978-1455526797
Product Dimensions: 9.2 x 6.3 x 1.6 inches
Shipping Weight: 1.6 pounds

About the Author

Jeffery Deaver was born outside of Chicago in 1950. His father was an advertising copywriter and his mother was a homemaker. He has one younger sister who writes novels for teenagers ‘ Julie Reece Deaver.

Deaver wrote his first book ‘ which consisted of two entire chapters ‘ when he was eleven, and he’s been writing ever since. An award-winning poet and journalist, he has also written and performed his own songs around the country. After receiving a Bachelor of Journalism degree from the University of Missouri, Deaver worked as a magazine writer, then, to gain the background needed to become a legal correspondent for The New York Times or Wall Street Journal, he enrolled at Fordham Law School. After graduation he decided to practice law for a time and worked for several years as an attorney for a large Wall Street firm. It was during his long commute to and from the office that he began writing the type of fiction he enjoyed reading: suspense novels. In 1990 he started to write full time.

The author of twenty-two novels, Deaver has been nominated for six Edgar Awards from the Mystery Writers of America, an Anthony award, a Gumshoe Award, and is a three-time recipient of the Ellery Queen Reader’s Award for Best Short Story of the Year. In 2001, he won the W.H. Smith Thumping Good Read Award for his Lincoln Rhyme novel The Empty Chair. In 2004, he was awarded the Crime Writers Association of Great Britain’s Ian Fleming Steel Dagger Award for Garden Of Beasts and the Short Story Dagger for “The Weekender.” Translated into 35 languages, his novels have appeared on a number of bestseller lists around the world, including the New York Times, the London Times and the Los Angeles Times. The Bone Collector was a feature release from Universal Pictures, starring Denzel Washington as Lincoln Rhyme. A Maiden’s Grave was made into an HBO film retitled Dead Silence, starring James Garner and Marlee Matlin.

Jeff has also released two collections of his short stories, called Twisted and More Twisted.

The book description is from Amazon.  Trouble in Mind: The Collected Stories, Volume 3