A Review of A Fistful of Clones by Seaton Kay-Smith

A Fistful of Clones

by Seaton Kay-Smith

4,0

When I read a book, I go out of my way not to have any preconceived notions about the story. Sure I will read the book’s description when it is first offered. How else would I know if I might possibly like to read it, but then I put the title in my calendar, and don’t read anything else about it until the date that I need to read it.

When I first started reading A Fistful of Clones, I didn’t really get it. Then it grew on me. I finally came to the conclusion that it felt like a movie. Kind of like one of the Coen Brothers films, think Fargo. The characters were all just a little off. Nothing was quite normal, but then once I got used to them, I started to see the humor in nearly everything that was happening. It was just absurd, but in a good way. I’m putting A Fistful of Clones back on my TBR list, maybe next May, because I want to read it again, but I don’t want to have it fresh in my mind. I think that it will even be better next time.

Now that I have read A Fistful of Clones, and I am preparing to review it, I discover that it started out as a screenplay. I can imagine that it would make a great film, if it was done right. It could be a real dog or a cult classic. The director would have to walk a fine line. He would have to keep his tongue firmly planted in his cheek, and allow the quirkiness of the characters to come out. It can’t be played straight. It really is a comedy, not a Sci-Fi flick about clones.

I give A Fistful of Clones 4 Stars out of 5, and a Big Thumbs Up! If you are ready for a subtly funny book, filled with odd characters, in odder situations, written by a new Australian author, then A Fistful of Clones is the book for you.

I received a Digital Review Copy from the publisher.

Book Description

A Fistful of Clones“If anyone else were to kill them it would be murder, for Henry, it would be suicide.”

Henry Madison is an apathetic young man with little to no ambition. When he loses his job and his girlfriend in one day, he is destitute and signs up for paid medical testing. the doctor creates clones of Henry and when these clones escape and start causing havoc in Henry’s life, he is hired in secret by the strange doctor and trained to hunt the clones down one by one and kill them. Henry soon finds out, however, that personality isn’t genetic but made of the experiences you have, and as time progresses, his clones become less carbon copied than he was lead to believe, growing their own identities and challenging Henry’s perception of what it means to be Henry Madison and of what it is right and what is wrong.

Seaton explains the genesis of his novel: “I first wrote ‘A Fistful of Clones’ as a screenplay between 2010 and 2011 and received an honourable mention for it in the 2011 Sundance: Table Read My Screenplay Competition. Then, not knowing how to get the screenplay made into a film, I decided in the summer of 2013/2014 to turn it into a book. So while it only took a few months to write the actual novel, I actually did the ground work and worked out the plot and the characters over a much longer time period.”

Book Details

File Size: 727 KB
Print Length: 192 pages
Publisher: AUS Impulse (March 1, 2015)
Publication Date: March 1, 2015
Sold by: HarperCollins Publishers
Language: English
ASIN: B00S47T19C

About the Author

Seaton Kay-SmithPreviously a writer and performer on Australia’s ABC2’s The Roast,  29-year-old Seaton Kay-Smith has also written for Dan Ilic’s A Rational Fear and performed stand-up comedy one-man shows at Sydney Fringe (2012-2014), Adelaide Fringe (2013) and Sydney International Comedy Festival (2013-2015).

Seaton is currently head writer at Sydney film and design collective, Paper Moose, where he has written several award-winning short films and an online sketch comedy series called Nick and Seaton (https://www.youtube.com/user/Palaceof…).

Seaton’s one-act play Arctic Fevers was selected and performed as part of Theatre 451’s 2014 season in Melbourne. In 2014, he wrote, produced and performed in Lost Pilots, a comedy radio series on FBi Radio, Sydney (https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/l… ).

In 2015 Seaton released his debut novel A Fistful of Clones*, an e-book through Harper Collins’ Impulse Imprint. Seaton now has a feature film in development with Beyond Productions. He still performs stand-up comedy mainly in Sydney but also in other cities.

* Seaton was a finalist for a feature film screenplay, also entitled “A Fistful of Clones”, for Sundance: Table Read My Screenplay in 2011 and this screenplay was the starting point for his novel.

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2 thoughts on “A Review of A Fistful of Clones by Seaton Kay-Smith”

  1. My dear Seaton, I feel that I must protest the dissonance which your portrait here causes me. I watched your appearances on TV when you, quite naturally, entranced Dawn French; and, I confess, that I myself was prodigiously smitten. I have always wanted to date a gay pirate (whether he was actually gay or not) and, quite naturally, when watching your performances I was weak with the knowledge that Heaven had, at last, smiled upon me. Now, to my extreme discomfort, I find that your photograph shows your (may I say) magnificent cascade of curls combed to your right. I must confess my dismay when – as you will surely appreciate – I first saw this evident shift in your otherwise charming. . .not to say beguiling. . .personality. I fear this evidences a profound shift in what had at first seemed a profound and, one hoped, an enduring allure as evidenced in your prior appearances when you leaned most decidedly to the left. I am devastated to my very core when considering what this change in direction might portend. Oh, I bed you (so sorry, a mere slip of the tongue, I assure you) I BEG you to return to your initial simplicity and the beguiling insouciance of your initial parting to your left. The world needs your initial honesty. (I’m willing to pay. If that should in any way sway the outcome. . .which I quite naturally doubt.)

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